Greyton Dwarsberg Pass eBiking Route - eBike Touring

Yesterday's ride involved a few sections of steep, technical riding - today we thought we'd explore the farmlands to the south of the delightful little town of Greyton in the Western Cape Overberg. We also did another road ride - the Riviersonderend River Loop - do check it out.

The Dwarsberg Pass Loop takes you over the low level bridge across the Riviersonderend River.

The Dwarsberg Pass Loop takes you over the low level bridge across the Riviersonderend River.

In 1854 an Englishman, Herbert Vigne, established a freehold village on his farm, Weltevreden. He called the village Greyton after Sir George Grey, the then Governor of the Cape, and it has stayed essentially the same, few additions and changes having been made over the years. Many of the original buildings and facilities remain as they were during Vigne's time - the leiwater irrigation system of street furrows, the town kraal and dipping tank, a blacksmith's house and forge, the school boarding house and the extensive public commonage amongst others.

The Lady Grace in Greyton. What a lovely place to stay.

The Lady Grace in Greyton. What a lovely place to stay.

After a comfortable night and morning at The Lady Grace we headed out of town on the R406, turning right onto a gravel road just after crossing the Gobos River. The Haibikes hummed quietly, power levels set to "Eco" on the flat roads. They seemed as happy as us to be heading out on a long ride... The happy, serene, blissful conditions were short lived as we needed to add power for the climb up Dwarsberg Pass. It's not particularly steep - just a long pull on really good gravel roads, behind us the glorious Riviersonderend Mountains looming up out of the golden wheat fields that stretched  out in all directions.

Wheatfields and the Riviersonderend Mountains as you pull up the Dwarsberg Pass.

Wheatfields and the Riviersonderend Mountains as you pull up the Dwarsberg Pass.

We put together this route on our Tracks4Africa Traveller's Africa map and our routing took us through beautiful farmlands - sheep, cattle, wheat and the occasional reedbuck our companions. I suspect that on some sections we were on "right of way" or "public servitude" roads as we needed to deal with a number of gates across them. We followed the old adventure biking and hiking rule: If it's closed, close it after you, and if it's open, leave it open. After a short while we found ourselves back on obvious public roads enjoying some lovely, fast sweeping sections of downhill, slowing down only once for a large herd of sheep being moved between grazing lands.

Those odd looking sheep? Them be lamas. And we are both hoping that they won't spit at us.

Those odd looking sheep? Them be lamas. And we are both hoping that they won't spit at us.

Can ebike touring get any better?

Can ebike touring get any better?

We hadn't allowed enough time and it was near dark when we pulled into Greyton - thank heavens for the LedLenser head torches that we had with us. Dinner was again at 1854 Restaurant and we fell into bed, asleep before our heads hit the pillows...

Click here to see more of our mountain biking photographs.

It was near dark when we got back to town, LedLensers lighting the way.

It was near dark when we got back to town, LedLensers lighting the way.

Track Distance: 40.5km round trip.

Route conditions: Great district roads make for easy, enjoyable riding. Dwarsberg Pass is a bit of a pull but you are on a eBike - if it gets too much, add some power.

The Lady Grace: S34° 03.022' E19° 36.518'

Vanilla Cafe: S34° 03.082' E19° 36.444'

1854 Restaurant: S32° 03.940' E19° 07.683'

Greyton Dwarsberg Pass Loop GPS Route